Summary

Summary

Click here to Download the Merchant of Venice Press Packet

The Merchant of Venice

Cast & Staff

Cast & Staff

THE CAST

(in order of their appearance)

Antonio Christopher Kanaga
Salanio, Balthazaar Sr. Phoenix Catlin
Bassanio James Bocock
Lorenzo Peter Haig
Gratiano, Aragon Kyle Norman
Portia Rachel McKendree
Nerissa Stephanie Haig
Shylock Sr. Danielle Dwyer
Launcelot, Tubal, Morrocco, Duke Brad Lussier
Jessica, Servingman Heather Norman

THE STAFF

Director
Sr. Danielle Dwyer

Technical Director
Chris Kanaga

News & Reviews

News & Reviews

From the Director

From the Director

Dear Friends,
Welcome to The Merchant of Venice; A Pound of Flesh Series.

The Merchant of Venice is an uncomfortable and confrontational play in practically every scene. There is no denying the hate, the prejudice, and the blatant superiority that seeps through most every character. Frank Underwood, Kevin Spacey’s character in House of Cards, has this to say:

“Hate starts in your gut, deep down here, where it stirs and churns and then it rises, hate rises fast and volcanic, it erupts hot on the breath.”

This would be true for many characters in this play. There is not one kind or gentle soul here, and all have joined the ranks of hate and prejudice.

The actor’s work is to inhabit their character and flesh them, fully and authentically. In doing so, Shakespeare’s story once again lives and breathes in a new space to a new audience, who desires to hear his enlightening words.

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” —Martin Luther King, Jr.

Shakespeare most definitely brought light to a dark subject. Looking at this dark and destructive emotion through this story, facing into this ravenous element we bring to our relationships, offers us a horizon of new choices.  There is no magic answer, and hate is ugly and heavy, but this story shines truth on the human relationships that live in small communities, in larger cities, in even larger countries bridging to nations.  If we can start in ourselves, looking at who we are and what we choose, then that recognition no longer stays as benign acceptance, but becomes an active agent for change.

All the best,
Sr. Danielle Dwyer

See and Hear

See and Hear